National Economic Policies

National Economic Policies

National Economic Policies

National Economic Policies

Synopsis

With increased economic competition among industrial countries, the need for rapid economic development in less developed countries, and the collapse of centrally planned regimes in Eastern Europe, concern for economic policies has moved to the forefront of most nations' agendas. This reference handbook offers and overview of economic policies in the world's most important countries and regions, examining the different mix of methods and tools these governments use to achieve their economic goals. The aim of the volume is to identify and compare the various policies and instruments used by the different countries, as well as the results that have been obtained.

Excerpt

The present volume is the first in a series of comparative economics handbooks. It presents an overview of national economic policies in the world's most important countries or groupings of countries. Future volumes will deal with more specific aspects of economic policies such as trade, monetary, fiscal, economic development, and environmental policies.

With increased economic competition among industrial countries, the need for rapid economic development in less developed countries, and the collapse of the centrally planned regimes in Eastern Europe, economic policies have moved to the forefront relative to political, defense, and other policies followed by most nations of the world (although, of course, all policies are interrelated). Few, however, would dispute that a well-managed economic system with high rates of growth and development, full employment, and little or no inflation, as well as a concern for the environment, are not among the top priorities of national governments throughout the world today.

Nations use fiscal, monetary, industrial, trade, and regulatory policies to achieve their economic goals. The purpose of this volume is to examine and compare the policies followed by different types of countries and examine their effects. There is today a great need to conduct this type of comparative study. Industrial, developing, and Eastern European countries can all learn a great deal from such a comparative study.

This volume contains a chapter on each of the largest countries in the world (the United States, Japan, India, the Soviet Union, and China) as well as a chapter on each of several homogeneous groupings of countries (the European Economic Community, the newly industrializing countries [NICs], and the countries of Latin America, Africa, and Eastern Europe). Of course, no two countries are identical, but similarities among countries in a specific group are greater . . .

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