Peace as a Women's Issue: A History of the U.S. Movement for World Peace and Women's Rights

Peace as a Women's Issue: A History of the U.S. Movement for World Peace and Women's Rights

Peace as a Women's Issue: A History of the U.S. Movement for World Peace and Women's Rights

Peace as a Women's Issue: A History of the U.S. Movement for World Peace and Women's Rights

Synopsis

A history of the ideologies and personalities of the feminist peace movement in the US. This study explores: connections between militarism and violence against women; women as the mothers of society; women as naturally responsible citizens; and the desire to be independent of male control.

Excerpt

This introduction is about process -- the process by which I came to realize exactly what this book is about. From the day I began this project six years ago, I have taken many twists and turns concerning the scope, direction, and definition of the work. At times, I have been constricted by sources; at others, by the proposed length. To a large measure, I have also been guided by the ebb and flow of peace activism itself. During some eras, issues consume the organizations involved; during others, organizational concerns and personalities dominate. Like people, political organizations and movements change with time, adjusting their outlook and behavior to the climate around them. in response, my work is framed by these fluctuations. For any given era, I chose to emphasize those characteristics that seemed most dominant. To my own surprise, they were not always clear-cut issues of war and peace.

This whole project came about in June 1986, as I was completing my dissertation on the Women's Peace Union, an interwar-era peace organization that tried to make war illegal through the adoption of a U.S. constitutional amendment. As I faced an uncertain period of partial or no employment and the postpartum depression often accompanying the conclusion of a major piece of writing, I turned to my dissertation advisor, Nancy Tomes, for an encouraging word. "What you need is a new project," she said in her most optimistic tone. Rather impulsively, I agreed.

When I look back at that moment now, I realize that Nancy was right. a new project always helps me to get over the rough times. However, there were moments during the next three years, as I held down . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.