The Italian Corporative State

The Italian Corporative State

The Italian Corporative State

The Italian Corporative State

Excerpt

What is meant by the Corporative State? Such is the question which an Italian citizen is constantly expected to answer to-day, when discussing political questions with a friend of some other nationality, and this question may now be said fairly to have taken the place of those others such as, "What does Fascism mean?" or "Who will be Mussolini's successor?" to which he had grown accustomed but a short while ago.

This new stage of evolution in the questions of persons interested in political developments shows that, as a result of what they have heard or of what they have read in articles by visitors to Italy, or in official communications, there is at last emerging a rough general idea of what Fascism really is and of what it sets out to accomplish. Moreover, it would appear that the more enlightened public would be grateful for further information, not merely as to the external aspects of the Fascist movement, but more particularly regarding the political structure which it has gradually brought into being.

Fascism, which arose in the first instance as a revolutionary manifestation, and has from the beginning claimed to be considered as such, might well to-day be regarded merely as a reactionary movement of a Conservative, bourgeois and anti-socialistic type, if it had simply limited itself to a forcible re-establishment of internal order and of discipline in the field of labour and had not at the same time brought about a change in existing institutions, inspiring them with a conception absolutely foreign to that which had previously characterised Democratic and Liberal Governments.

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