Social Pathology: A Systematic Approach to the Theory of Sociopathic Behavior

Social Pathology: A Systematic Approach to the Theory of Sociopathic Behavior

Social Pathology: A Systematic Approach to the Theory of Sociopathic Behavior

Social Pathology: A Systematic Approach to the Theory of Sociopathic Behavior

Excerpt

Perhaps this book is best described as the outcome of an effort to write, in a context of discovery and exploration, within a rigorously delimited area of human behavior. This delimitation of the field of study, together with the conceptual orientation of the work, will be found in Part One. In Part Two an attempt is made to test the sufficiency of the theory with data drawn from what, with the possible exception of radicalism, are conventionally regarded as social "pathologies." The theoretical portion of the work presumes a minimum familiarity on the part of the reader with the elemental sociological concepts, and no effort has been made to direct the discussions to any particular student level. If students experience difficulties in understanding the content of the first four chapters, these difficulties should be considerably mitigated by the explicit and implicit reiteration of the theory in the substantive chapters which follow. Case-history studies of deviants by the students are suggested as a teaching aid to permit a better mastery of the theoretical ideas in the book. An outline for such case-history studies will be found in the Appendix.

Some of the author's associates have kindly given of their time to read and criticize portions of the book while it was still in manuscript form. Leonard Broom read the theoretical material and the chapter on prostitution. Phillip Selznick and Scott Greer offered critical suggestions on the chapter on radicalism. Ralph Turner gave his critical attention to the chapter on mental disorders, and Don Cressey went over the discussion of crime. Charles Van Riper must be credited with inspiring the writer's early interest in speech defects. The writer freely acknowledges his indebtedness to these persons for the opportunities they provided to exchange ideas on the subjects in the book. Final responsibility for the contents of the chapters remains, of course, with the author alone. In preparing the manuscript for publication, Betty Omohundro relieved the writer of many burdensome chores, and Frances Ishida did some important last-minute stints on the typewriter, for which thanks are hereby tendered. A respectful salute is also due the author's many students who entered into the spirit of exploratory analysis and raised lively debates over the "concepts."

WEST Los ANGELES, CALIF.EDWIN M. LEMERT January, 1951 . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.