Rome and the West

Rome and the West

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Rome and the West

Rome and the West

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Dr. Davis has placed high school teachers of history under an obligation which they will be quick to recognize. This book takes rank by itself. There are excellent "source books" in Greek and Roman history adapted to their own valuable work. But this is not a source book, in the usual sense. Fitly, it calls itself Readings. It unfolds a panorama of ancient life -- etched, drawn, painted, caricatured, by contemporaries. No great phase of that life is neglected, and I take this opportunity to testify my special delight in the attractive presentation of two important epochs often slighted, -- the Hellenic World after Alexander and the Roman Imperial World. It was a happy adaptation of workman to work that persuaded Dr. Davis to this task. His instinct for dramatic story and striking situation, and his faultless literary sense, have never, I believe, served better use. The boy or girl who once gets hold on the volume is sure to breathe in more of the atmosphere of the ancient world than from any possible study of a conventional textbook. Indeed, the Readings will lend needed light and color to any text-book. In my judgment, a high school class in Ancient History should have this book, not merely in the library for occasional reference, but constantly in the hands of each student. If that is arranged, most other "library work" may, perhaps, be omitted by a first-year class without serious loss, providing the following year in Modern History is so planned as to put emphasis on library reference. Not all varieties of historical training can be given with equal stress in one year -- certainly not in a first . . .

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