Historical Perspectives and the International Status of Comparative Psychology

Historical Perspectives and the International Status of Comparative Psychology

Historical Perspectives and the International Status of Comparative Psychology

Historical Perspectives and the International Status of Comparative Psychology

Excerpt

Ethel Tobach American Museum of Natural History, New York

Most of the chapters in this volume were presented at sessions organized by the newly formed International Society for Comparative Psychology either before or during the 15th annual meeting of the Cheiron Society at Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1983. The plan to hold the meeting in conjunction with the Cheiron Society was prompted by the need to form the new organization before the next International Congress of Psychology sponsored by the International Union of Psychological Sciences scheduled to take place in 1984 in Acapulco, Mexico. The timing was essential, because the new organization would have to be presented at that meeting for consideration for affiliate status to the IUPsyS, or else wait 2 or 4 more years for such action, if it were to take place. By having its first international meeting in 1983, the Society could establish itself as having had at least one international meeting, elect officers, regularly publish some type of communication for its members, and in general "be in business" by 1984.

In fact, by the time the 1984 IUPsyS International Congress of Psychology took place, programs had been organized, the Newsletter had appeared fairly regularly, and the Society was able to apply for affiliate status in 1984, which it was unanimously granted by the IUPsyS Assembly.

Meeting with the Cheiron Society was most appropriate, and the theme of History in this first volume of the proceedings of the Society emerges naturally for several reasons. During the last 2 decades, comparative psychologists have become self-conscious about their history because of the developments and strains within the scientific community that studies the evolution and development of behavior (Tobach,Adler, &Adler, 1973). This was a predisposing process that led the comparative psychologists to the Cheiron Society.

Second, the very first meeting of a comparative psychology society took place . . .

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