The Man in the Mirror: William Marion Reedy and His Magazine

The Man in the Mirror: William Marion Reedy and His Magazine

The Man in the Mirror: William Marion Reedy and His Magazine

The Man in the Mirror: William Marion Reedy and His Magazine

Excerpt

For almost thirty years William Marion Reedy edited the Mirror, a St. Louis weekly magazine which came to exert a subtle, provocative influence in America and abroad. One is constantly running across allusions showing how closely certain leaders attended to his exuberant irony during the fateful years between the start of our war with Spain and the end of our first war with the Central Powers. "Not to know Reedy argues yourselves unknown," said a fellow editor, unwittingly posing Reedy's notoriety beside the devil's. But if he was sometimes devilish as a political satirist, the editor of Reedy's Mirror was better known as a humorist, a critic, and a discoverer. Pater, Yeats, and Emily Dickinson were among his early literary finds. Theodore Dreiser and Edgar Lee Masters were proud to count themselves among his later ones.

"Where can I find Reedy?" is said to have been Frank Harris's first question on stepping off the gangplank in New York, in 1916. Some say the British editor was only momentarily nonplused to learn that he still had nearly a thousand miles to go, and set off at once.

How then explain the obscurity that has settled like dust on Reedy's name? In St. Louis, where he spent his life, he is still fairly well known. Elsewhere he is familiar only to a handful of specialists in literary or political history. Perhaps the reason is that he was a seeker of values in poetry and public life which his contemporaries considered unimportant-- and his successors took for granted. In any event the fame he attracted in the last five or six years of his life flickered . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.