Science since Babylon

Science since Babylon

Science since Babylon

Science since Babylon

Excerpt

This book had its origin in a set of five public lectures given at the Sterling Memorial Library at Yale University during October and November 1959 under the auspices of the Yale Department of History. At that time, they were designed not for publication but rather to attract the attention of humanists and scientists by oral presentation to what is usually called the History of Science, but for which I prefer the eccentric but broader term Humanities of Science.

The subject (whatever its name) had just come through a stage in its growing up during which it almost seemed as though every would-be practitioner of the art deemed it necessary to exhibit the completeness of his dedication by writing the history of the whole of science through all its periods. Hoping that this historiographic phase had evaporated, and feeling incompetent in too many scientific and historical directions, I resolved instead to essay the experiment of speaking only from those areas in which I had reasonable firsthand experience at research.

Within this limitation I strove to cover the gamut of the historical range from the Babylonians to the near future, bringing in as many fields of application as possible in the hope of showing humanists that our new discipline might make an interesting neighbor to their own. I hoped, in addition, to show scientists that we ought to be able to talk about science with as much scholarly right as other human-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.