Development during the Transition to Adolescence

Development during the Transition to Adolescence

Development during the Transition to Adolescence

Development during the Transition to Adolescence

Synopsis

Research on the processes of change during the transition from middle childhood to adolescence has been a relatively neglected area of scholarship until recently. This volume, features prominent researchers who provide integrative accounts of their research programs, focusing on processes of physical, social, and cognitive change during this important transition period in development. Also included in this volume is an overview, discussion, and critical analysis of core conceptual issues in the study of adolescent transition.

Excerpt

This volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology, held October 23-25, 1986, at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. As has been the tradition for this annual series, the faculty of the Institute of Child Development invited internationally eminent researchers to present their work and to consider problems of mutual concern.

The theme of the 21st Symposium, and the present volume, was development during the transition to adolescence. The adolescent years are increasingly receiving research attention, but the nature and course of changes from childhood to adolescence have rarely been addressed in empirical studies. In recent years, however, several major research efforts on physical, social and cognitive transitions during this period have begun to focus on issues and processes of change. The goal of the 21 st Symposium was to assemble a group of active scholars from several disciplines who had in common an interest in the processes of change during the transition from childhood to adolescence.

We were fortunate to have as contributors to the symposium some of the most outstanding current scholars in this area. The speakers were Christopher Coe, Glen Elder, John Hill, Roberta Simmons, and Judith Smetana. They discussed a variety of issues pertinent to our understanding of this transition period, including the role of gonadal hormones, the impact of menarche and social-cognitive development on familial conflict, and the influence on the adolescent of social and historical change. In addition to these speakers, we were also fortunate to have three scholars with us who took on the task of providing a framework for discussion of the presentations: W. Andrew Collins who served as the keynote speaker and provided an overview of the current state of research in this area; Catherine R. Cooper who focused our attention on the issue of conflict, its . . .

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