Mozart Studies 2

Mozart Studies 2

Mozart Studies 2

Mozart Studies 2

Synopsis

Published to complement Mozart Studies (published in 1991), Mozart Studies 2 offers a forum for the most important trends in recent Mozart scholarship, including substantial contributions in gender and genre studies, close readings of individual works (among them the `Prague' symphony and Le nozze di Figaro), textual and contextual research and new directions in analysis, both for the operas and instrumental music. At the same time, it also aims to suggest directions for future research. In addition to Cliff Eisen, the contributors include leading Mozart scholars, among them Mary Hunter, John Platoff, Wolf-Dieter Seiffert, and Elaine Sisman.

Excerpt

The anxieties of the Mozart bicentennial are by now a distant memory. in any case, they seem to me to have been largely unjustified. True, in the years leading up to and including 1991, the deluge of Mozartiana in the scholarly press (to say nothing of the popular press and recording and performing industries) rose to near epic proportions. Yet my overwhelming impression is that important new trends emerged in most of these publications: rather than rehash the academic debates and revelations of the previous thirty-five years, many of them struck out in new directions, including not only traditional fields of enquiry such as source studies and problems of authenticity and chronology, but also ideas and methodologies that, firmly established elsewhere, have only slowly taken root in Mozart scholarship.

These new trends--the contextual and the 'critical' (often not to be separated)--are most evident in the study of Mozart's operas. They are represented here in articles by Mary Hunter and John Platoff. Mary Hunter's article on the Countess Almaviva in Figaro takes as its point of departure Rousseau La Nouvelle Héloïse, and in particular the character of Julie D'Étange, to explore not only the notion of 'separate spheres' and 'female domains', but also modes of representation; she concludes with a theoretical consideration of the ways in which representation 'performs' an ideology of 'separate spheres' and has implications for opera in general. John Platoff, on the other hand, writes on the nature of tonal planning in Mozart's operas, a perennially popular topic which has, however, never been addressed in a systematic way. His is a contextual study, based on a detailed investigation of tonal relationships in the broader Viennese opera buffa repertoire of the 1780s. He concludes that tonal organization in Mozart's operas is generally far more haphazard than we like to believe.

While opera studies represent the trend-setters in current Mozart scholarship, instrumental music, too, has increasingly become the focus of new methodologies and analytical approaches. Elaine Sisman's article on the 'Prague' Symphony is not only a topical analysis, but also a rhetorical, figural, and gestural one. Ultimately she is concerned with understanding the special qualities of the symphony arising from the intersection of these facets of the work. Wolf-Dieter Seiffert's article addresses a different kind of problem. Beginning with an . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.