The Enormous Vogue of Things Mexican: Cultural Relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935

The Enormous Vogue of Things Mexican: Cultural Relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935

The Enormous Vogue of Things Mexican: Cultural Relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935

The Enormous Vogue of Things Mexican: Cultural Relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935

Excerpt

The histories of Mexico and the United States have been inter- twined since the beginning of their existence as independent nations. Diplomatic relations were established in 1822 and were maintained despite occasional ruptures and the war of 1846-48. Economic links were also forged early in the nineteenth century and became more important with the passage of time, especially during the regime of Porfirio Díaz (1876-1911), when American capitalists invested millions of dollars in Mexican mining, industry, and transportation. The railroads financed by American capital during the Díaz era brought the cities of the two countries closer together physically than ever before. These investments encouraged the formation of a substantial American community in Mexico, consisting of nearly twenty-one thousand residents in 1910, when the total population of the country was approximately 15 million. In acquiring half of Mexico's territory in 1848, the United States also acquired a sizable Mexican population, which was subsequently augmented by steady and increasing emigration northward across the border. During the violent decade (1910-20) of the Mexican Revolution alone, nearly nine hundred thousand immigrants and "temporary" migrants crossed the border, along with uncounted thousands of refugees. To be sure, the relationship between the two countries was always shaped, and some would say determined, by the relative weakness of Mexico vis-à-vis the economic and military preponderance of the United States, a relationship captured in the wry . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.