Marketing to the Mind: Right Brain Strategies for Advertising and Marketing

Marketing to the Mind: Right Brain Strategies for Advertising and Marketing

Marketing to the Mind: Right Brain Strategies for Advertising and Marketing

Marketing to the Mind: Right Brain Strategies for Advertising and Marketing

Synopsis

Psychologist Maddock and his co-author Fulton give the readers a clear understanding of how the mind works, based on up-to-date research, and a new way to understand human motivation and behavior. Drawing uniquely from medicine, clinical psychology, and the practice that will provide advertisers with almost a blueprint for executing creative strategies and developing marketing plans with a better chance of success. In so doing, the authors make clear that "marketing to the mind" is a diagnostic technique, a way to quickly and inexpensively analyze consumer resistance. With concepts, theories, and research clearly laid out, the authors show how the technique can be applied to a variety of products and services. A practical and engrossing book for the advertising and marketing community, and for teachers, consultants, and students too.

Excerpt

The unconscious side of marketing neither replaces nor removes the motivational systems that me already in place and in use in predicting consumer behavior. Instead, the unconscious side adds a new and exciting dimension, a third dimension that opens up a perspective in consumer motivation that has not been seen before. Marketing to the Mind addresses what is going on inside the consumers' minds and what they are thinking, as they make purchasing decisions, affirm loyalties, and respond to advertising. It is the emotional/affective dimension.

In a paper that won the 1993 Award for Distinguished Professional Contribution to Consumer Psychology at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Krugman (1994) addressed the need for such an approach. Krugman suggested that none of the core subdisciplines of psychology have studied the likes and dislikes of people in general. He added that the everyday data of consumer research is the perfect forum for such a focus, presumably because the consumer psychologist is studying people when they spend their money. The unspoken implication of his paper is that American psychology in general and consumer psychology in particular have taken a limited approach. Much of it has relied upon Pavlov's research, which assumes that all behavior can be conditioned. Krugman concludes that "consequently, their research has investigated every other stimuli except the stimulus directly related to the response being studied."

Unfortunately, when such a narrow approach is taken to the study of behavior, it becomes more and more difficult to make predictions. Therefore, to broaden the scope of consumer psychology, advertising effects are now measured by taking into account the intervening variable, which intervenes between the simple stimulus (S) and the simple response (R). Hansen (1994) refers to this as the S--O--R model, where S represents the stimulus (advertising); O represents the intervening variables; and R represents the response (buy-no buy). The example that Hansen . . .

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