Siting Hazardous Waste Treatment Facilities: The Nimby Syndrome

Siting Hazardous Waste Treatment Facilities: The Nimby Syndrome

Siting Hazardous Waste Treatment Facilities: The Nimby Syndrome

Siting Hazardous Waste Treatment Facilities: The Nimby Syndrome

Synopsis

Since the 1960s and 70s, a wave of environmental awareness has swept the United States. News reports of oil spills, DDT damage to wildlife, and the nuclear near-disaster at Three Mile Island have, among other incidents, contributed to what has become known as the NIMBY ("Not In My Backyard" ) syndrome. Portney argues that local opposition to the siting of much needed hazardous waste treatment facilities must be fully understood before it can be effectively met by government entities.

Excerpt

This book is about the Not-in-my-backyard (NIMBY) Syndrome and how it affects siting hazardous waste treatment facilities. It investigates the social values and attitudes that underlie the nimby Syndrome. in the process, the predominant practices and underlying theories of facility siting are examined, and it is suggested that the processes of siting facilities must be more explicitly thought of as political. What makes this book different from others on siting is that it derives a promising strategy that might facilitate future siting efforts. Indeed, the ultimate objective of this book is to present a type of strategy heretofore not pursued. This strategy, which we call "risk substitution," holds the promise that facilities can be sited without requiring people to change their values or their personal assessments (perceptions) concerning how dangerous it is to live near such a facility. the proposed strategy is not theoretically or conceptually perfect. Most strategies are not. But it responds to the idea that if something works in practice, it will probably work in theory.

Perhaps the most difficult aspect of putting forth a potentially effective strategy is the possible "downside" or consequences of that strategy. Indeed, the idea is predicated on the assumption, whether reasonable or not, that hazardous waste treatment facilities can and will be made safer than the currently practiced . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.