Cultural Resource Management: Archaeological Research, Preservation Planning, and Public Education in the Northeastern United States

Cultural Resource Management: Archaeological Research, Preservation Planning, and Public Education in the Northeastern United States

Cultural Resource Management: Archaeological Research, Preservation Planning, and Public Education in the Northeastern United States

Cultural Resource Management: Archaeological Research, Preservation Planning, and Public Education in the Northeastern United States

Synopsis

Cultural resource management (CRM) involves research, legislation, and education related to the conservation, protection, and interpretation of historic and prehistoric archaeological resources. Kerber's work is divided into four major categories of discussion: theoretical and interpretive frameworks, research methodology, legislation and compliance, and creative protection strategies. The only volume on CRM in Northeastern America since Spiess's Conservation Archaeology in 1978, its contributors are all major participants in archaeology in the Northeast, which includes the six New England states and New York. Because the volume presents successful models and practical advice concerning CRM, it is relevant to regions other than the Northeast and can be helpful in providing a comparative framework for evaluating programs elsewhere in the United States.

Excerpt

This book brings together a wide range of approaches to cultural resource management (CRM) in the northeastern United States that address four major interrelated themes: theoretical and interpretive frameworks; research methodology; legislation and compliance; and creative protection strategies. the authors of the 13 chapters reflect this diversity in approaches: they are affiliated with academic archaeology, contract archaeology, avocational archaeology, and preservation planning; several are affiliated with more than one of these areas. in addition, the book represents a sample of the most current ways in which crm is being practiced and conceptualized in the Northeast today. Although some of these approaches may not be entirely new to the region, they nevertheless provide innovative responses to a host of problems and difficulties that face crm. the models and practical advice discussed should be useful to readers beyond the Northeast in their attempt to improve crm elsewhere.

The development of this book can be traced partly to a 1992 symposium, Innovative Approaches to Cultural Resource Management in the Northeastern United States, that I organized and chaired at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in Pittsburgh. Six of the chapters are expanded versions of papers given in this symposium. the actual idea for the book developed about a year earlier, largely in recognition of the absence of an integrated volume on crm in the region since Arthur Spiess 1978 edited volume, Conservation Archaeology in the Northeast. Toward a Research Orientation. At the rate that crm is evolving, and as various challenges continue to confront crm, it is hoped that other works of similar scope on the topic will be produced for the Northeast at intervals shorter than 16 years.

I owe an enormous debt of gratitude to many individuals who made it possible for me to gain experience in crm as a researcher, educator, and preservation planner, and ultimately to be able to complete this book. These . . .

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