Prophet of Liberty: The Life and Times of Wendell Phillips

Prophet of Liberty: The Life and Times of Wendell Phillips

Prophet of Liberty: The Life and Times of Wendell Phillips

Prophet of Liberty: The Life and Times of Wendell Phillips

Excerpt

A sleepy man with a portly figure and brown wig reached the mansion of Governor Eustis in Roxbury at the wan hour of two o'clock on the morning of the twenty-fifth of August, 1824. The Governor was a fine old fellow with a bush of gray hair that stood out under a three-cornered beaver which he wore on state occasions. When his guest arrived at the door, he cried out with honest enthusiasm--"Oh, this is the happiest day of my life."

A great cavalcade of heaving torches and a shower of rockets announced the arrival of La Fayette.

After a little more than two hours sleep, the Marquis was awakened at dawn by the booming of guns and the music of a band. He looked out of the window and there maneuvering on the lawn was his old Light Infantry, the Marquis's own, red and black plumes and all. Calling to his son and secretary and valet to come and see, he exclaimed, "My brave Light Infantry! It is exactly like that they were uniformed. What courage! What resignation! And how I loved them!"

The festivities of the day began. The crowds were so immense that they were two hours in covering the two miles from Roxbury to Boston. At the city limits they were met by Mayor Quincy in an open calash with the Common Council in carriages. The procession halted while bread and cheese, at the expense of the municipality, and free punch were served to the people.

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