Women's Careers: Pathways and Pitfalls

Women's Careers: Pathways and Pitfalls

Women's Careers: Pathways and Pitfalls

Women's Careers: Pathways and Pitfalls

Synopsis

Women's Careers explores contexts and strategies that advance or hinder women's career development. It brings readers up-to-date on the intersection of the cross-disciplinary fields of career development, women's studies, and human resources. The applied focus and broad range of topics covered will appeal to scholars and professionals in these fields. Women's Careers examines four key topic areas: an introduction to current issues and research; planning and preparation, including insights into topics such as mentors' roles, cultural differences, women and leadership, and career versus family conflicts; challenges in the work environment for women entrepreneurs and supervisors; and affirmative action and sexual harassment.

Excerpt

A growing interest in women's careers has spread to personal, academic, and organizational life. The proliferation and quality of research on women and work that we saw as program chairs of the 1986 International Conference on Women and Organizations inspired us to edit this book. That highly successful conference was the source of several chapters included here.

Our goal was to select timely topics that had immediate relevance to career women, students, and scholars of women and work. Part I of the book begins with an introduction by the editors which highlights five major issues that affect working women and what has been learned about those issues in the 1980s. Other chapters are ordered thematically. In Part II, "Personal Career Planning," the themes touch on pathways and pitfalls confronting women as they plan their career strategies. In Chapters 2, 3, and 4, Shapiro and Farrow discuss the merits of mentors, Case analyzes women's speech, and Ely explores women's leadership styles, respectively; with an eye to how women can apply the information to their own work situation. Family relationships also have been shown to affect women's careers. In Chapter 5, "Husbands' Job Satisfaction and Wives' Income," and Chapter 6, "Have Women's Career and Family Values Changed?" questions are raised concerning the relationship between marriage, family, and careers. In Chapter 7, Chao and Malik present a career planning model which ties together individual, organizational, and societal constraints and facilitators of professional development.

Part III, "The Challenge of the Workplace," deals with broader issues related to the context of work. Stella Nkomo, in Chapter 8, presents the unique problems black women face that have not been addressed ade-

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