Let Every Child Be Wanted: How Social Marketing Is Revolutionizing Contraceptive Use around the World

Let Every Child Be Wanted: How Social Marketing Is Revolutionizing Contraceptive Use around the World

Let Every Child Be Wanted: How Social Marketing Is Revolutionizing Contraceptive Use around the World

Let Every Child Be Wanted: How Social Marketing Is Revolutionizing Contraceptive Use around the World

Synopsis

This book provides the first comprehensive examination of contraceptive social marketing. It includes a full description of the most important of these programs, documenting a form of international assistance that has attracted over $1 billion from governments and other donors. The book contains a wealth of previously unpublished material that illustrates this remarkable story. The author challenges the widespread belief that family planning can only be made available through medically-oriented programs and that foreign assistance must be catalytic rather than long-term.

Excerpt

It was early morning in Calcutta, March 1964. Peter King was walking the seven blocks from his apartment at number 2 Hungerfurd Street along Chorine to New Market near the center of the city. Though it was only 6:30, already the air was stifling. King was perspiring heavily after just two blocks, but he was as oblivious to this as he was to the growing cacophony of sounds around him: the thousands of street-dwellers who live on Calcutta's sidewalks who were beginning their day with ablutions from fire hydrants and pots and pans; the thousands of rickshaws being puffed by barefoot men jogging and straining against the weight of their human cargos; the taxis--horns blaring--swarming along Chowringee, Calcutta's largest and busiest street, each fighting for advantage in the great and growing tangle of trucks, cars, bicycles, rickshaws, bullock carts, two-wheeled trundles, cargo carts, scooters, and other conveyances. Hawks circled overhead and crows cawed from the leafy foliage of Bodhi trees, competing with the cries of the hawkers, the jingling of the bicycle bells, and the deep growling of the trucks and buses. Peter King was oblivious to all this because an exciting idea was taking shape in his mind. King and his colleagues at the Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta, were conceiving a revolutionary approach to India's family planning challenge.

Peter King knew the Indian government was fully committed to family planning. Top officials were convinced that the astonishing growth in the population of India--more than twelve million people being added every year--seemed an impediment to the country's social and economic im-

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