Telecommunications Deregulation: Market Power and Cost Allocation Issues

Telecommunications Deregulation: Market Power and Cost Allocation Issues

Telecommunications Deregulation: Market Power and Cost Allocation Issues

Telecommunications Deregulation: Market Power and Cost Allocation Issues

Synopsis

This volume explores critical issues in telecommunications regulatory policy by using a unique multidisciplinary lens to focus on the problems of market power and cost allocation in long distance telecommunications markets. The contributors approach the subject from the traditional perspectives of economics and law but also incorporate developments in newer disciplines such as operations research, decision theory, policy analysis, and corporate strategy. Each section includes a series of main papers as well as critical reviews by scholars using methodologies from other disciplines.

Excerpt

In October 1987, the Center for Legal and Regulatory Studies in the University of Texas Graduate School of Business, along with the Public Utility Commission of Texas, the University's ic Institute, and the rgk Foundation sponsored a path-breaking conference in Austin on the issues of market power and cost allocation in interexchange (long distance) telecommunication markets. the objective of this conference was not only to bring together prominent scholars from the traditionally involved disciplines of law and economics, but also to subject the contributions of these disciplines to review and commentary by scholars from other disciplines such as operations research, decision theory, policy analysis, and corporate strategy. in addition to the multidisciplinary perspective of the academic participants, state and federal regulators, industry representatives, practicing attorneys, and consultants contributed greatly to the vigor and practicality as well as the breadth with which issues were examined. This volume collects the papers from that conference.

Since the breakup of AT&T by the federal government in the early 1980s, the telecommunication industry has witnessed an acceleration of the trend toward greater competition that had already begun to pressure the century-old monopoly. Both local exchange and interexchange markets have been affected, although technological advances have enlivened competition to a greater extent in the latter than in the former.

Telecommunication thus finds itself in the midst of a transition from a condition of unquestioned monopoly to one characterized by degrees of competition that vary greatly by service category and geographic area. Although this conversion has created unique challenges for policy makers at all levels of government, the political heat generated by the friction of change has been especially intense in state legislatures and utility regulatory agencies. State regulation, especially in the area of intrastate long distance . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.