The Administration of American Foreign Affairs

The Administration of American Foreign Affairs

The Administration of American Foreign Affairs

The Administration of American Foreign Affairs

Excerpt

I wrote the following pages in the belief that it is just as important to talk about how our foreign policy is made and carried out as it is to talk about the policy itself. There are books aplenty about foreign policy, past, present, and proposals for the future. There are also some books about the conduct of foreign affairs in the world. They emphasize the legal arrangements among nations, the formal and traditional machinery of international relations, or the history of episodes of the development and negotiation of particular policies. Nearly any good library card catalog will lead a reader into this interesting and enlightening literature. I have not included here beyond mere mention anything concerning the rules of diplomacy, the formal powers of the President and Senate, the detailed functions and authorities of missions abroad, or the other traits that make up the usual discussion of the conduct of foreign affairs.

Our concern here is with the administration of foreign affairs in terms of the organization of government, the people who do the work, and she consequences of the work done by people in organization. Observers of public administration, including myself, tend to think that the way executive agenrues are organized and conducted has a direct relevance to the product of their work. Foreign affairs will be affected by the condition of the administration of foreign affairs, and foreign policy will be only as informed and as consistent as . . .

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