Education for the Gifted

Education for the Gifted

Education for the Gifted

Education for the Gifted

Excerpt

The National Society for the Study of Education is now presenting its third yearbook on the subject of the desirability of providing opportunities for reasonable adaptations of curriculums and procedures of formal education to the extraordinary capacities and interests of the gifted segments of school populations. The first of the two earlier publications in this field of study, Part II of the Society's Nineteenth Yearbook, entitled Classroom Problems in the Education of Gifted Children, summarized available reports on flexible promotion plans and special rooms for gifted pupils. But the major portion of the volume described in detail the methods and results of an experimental program conducted in a special room of one of the public schools in Urbana, Illinois. The experiment involved thirty pupils selected from the fifth and sixth grades on the basis of the judgment of their teachers with respect to "their scholastic records, their health, industry, and application."

Part I of the Society's Twenty-third Yearbook, The Education of Gifted Children, presented a more comprehensive report on the problems dealt with in the Nineteenth Yearbook and included numerous other considerations, such as methods of identifying gifted pupils, their physical and mental traits, outcomes of newer school experiments in providing special training for them, and their subsequent careers in high school and college. It is interesting to note that Dr. Whipple, Secretary of the Society and chairman of that yearbook committee, suggested that the instant volume, a book of 443 pages, be considered a preliminary report in the hope that at some later time the Society might issue another report on the same subject "that shall include a definite program to which all members of the committee may subscribe."

Whether or not all members of the present yearbook committee would subrcribe to all of the pronouncements of the several contributors to the volume, Education for the Gifted, it is not too much to claim for the committee that this report does complete the series of the Society's contributions to the literature of its field and brings the Society's discussion of the problem up to date. It is expected . . .

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