William Faulkner: Early Prose and Poetry

William Faulkner: Early Prose and Poetry

William Faulkner: Early Prose and Poetry

William Faulkner: Early Prose and Poetry

Excerpt

William Faulkner added to his already growing reputation in Japan when he took part in the seminar of university teachers and students held at Nagano in 1955. Strongly impressed by him, members of that seminar have said they doubt they will ever again experience such an incandescent meeting. And younger Japanese students have volunteered that they not only admire Faulkner's fiction but would like to thank him for the address he wrote "To the Youth of Japan."

Now that Faulkner is again the subject of study by a seminar of students and teachers in Japan, at the University of Tokyo, it is pleasant to present to them in this volume some of the work he produced forty years ago while he himself was part of a university community.

When Faulkner's University of Mississippi poetry, prose, and drawings first came to the compiler's knowledge, it seemed well not to reprint such early work. His great, mature books had not yet won him the Nobel Prize; and though readers were admiring them in increasing numbers, many critics still held them in low regard. But now, widely recognized as a major world writer, Faulkner has Such stature that even his earliest works are of interest to many. So it no longer seems helpful to postpone reprinting such pieces. And it seems well to reprint them now in the hope of avoiding confusion like that which a few years ago accompanied the reprinting of Faulkner's early New Orleans newspaper sketches: During the same . . .

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