India's Urban Future: Selected Studies from an International Conference Sponsored by Kingsley Davis, Richard L. Park [And] Catherine Bauer Wurster. Edited by Roy Turner

India's Urban Future: Selected Studies from an International Conference Sponsored by Kingsley Davis, Richard L. Park [And] Catherine Bauer Wurster. Edited by Roy Turner

India's Urban Future: Selected Studies from an International Conference Sponsored by Kingsley Davis, Richard L. Park [And] Catherine Bauer Wurster. Edited by Roy Turner

India's Urban Future: Selected Studies from an International Conference Sponsored by Kingsley Davis, Richard L. Park [And] Catherine Bauer Wurster. Edited by Roy Turner

Excerpt

The present book, like most collective enterprises, is partly the outgrowth of particular circumstances. In 1959 the three undersigned, although representing different academic fields, found ourselves at the same university (California, Berkeley campus) and interested in the same subject, urbanization. We also found ourselves interested in the same country, India. What could be more natural, then, than our decision to join together in a study of urbanization in India?

Behind our interest lay some developments in the world which gave significance to, and thus explained, our joint concern with this specific topic. For one thing, the process of urbanization is now more rapid and massive and affects a greater part of the world than ever before, mainly because it is now rampant in the less developed countries, which still embrace some three fourths of the world's people. The migration of hundreds of millions of rural folk to cities in these still chiefly agrarian countries is revolutionizing the life of humanity just as surely as are the other major aspects of economic and social modernization, and the unprecedented rates of over-all population growth are helping, along with the rural-urban migration, to swell the populations of individual cities to figures hardly known anywhere a half century ago. Necessarily, social, economic, and political problems of major significance are being created by the huge rural-urban migration and the rapid rise of giant cities in countries whose main orientation has until recently been agricultural.

Seeing that the major trends and problems of urbanization occur now in the less industrial countries, we thought that India should . . .

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