Europe and the German Question

Europe and the German Question

Europe and the German Question

Europe and the German Question

Excerpt

During an historical crisis when the destiny of the world is being decided, personal reminiscences may seem an untimely impertinence. But the brief account of my life I propose to give is justified by the fact that my experiences and observations throw light on the development which is the subject of my book.

I must begin by insisting that although I am deprived of my nationality and live far from my native land my soul has never lost its fatherland. I address my fellow- countrymen not only as a patriotic German--whose patriotism however is given to a country still invisible--but also as a German who knows Europe and therefore believes it his vocation to explain to his people the reaction of the rest of the world to German aggression and thus help to pave the way for an eventual reconciliation between Germany and Europe.

It is no merit of mine but the gift of a fortunate inheritance and peculiarly favorable circumstances that I have remained immune from the intellectual and spiritual movements which have carried captive the vast majority of my countrymen since the foundation of the Second Reich. My father, director of the Berlin observatory, had been a pupil of Humboldt's and had remained faithful all his life to his master's profession of faith that the whole of past history teaches us that "in the life of nations under the protection of a Higher Providence a desire long cherished and directed to a noble ideal is finally satisfied." He was therefore the consistent opponent of everything for which Bismarck stood, for he was firmly convinced that the deep- rooted German desire to realize the ideal of international cooperation must finally triumph over all aberrations. He . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.