How the Far East Was Lost: American Policy and the Creation of Communist China, 1941-1949

How the Far East Was Lost: American Policy and the Creation of Communist China, 1941-1949

How the Far East Was Lost: American Policy and the Creation of Communist China, 1941-1949

How the Far East Was Lost: American Policy and the Creation of Communist China, 1941-1949

Excerpt

The Far Eastern policy pursued during the Roosevelt-Truman administrations has long been the subject of spirited controversy among historians. This volume is the result of seven years of intensive research into a mass of documentary data dealing with the Communist conquest of China. As I have read these documents, both published and unpublished, it has become apparent that there was a connecting thread drawing them all together. Both a friendly attitude towards Communism on the part of many prominent officials in the Roosevelt-Truman administrations and a belief that in the future, the Soviet and American systems could abide in friendly fashion, led to an American commitment to a futile partnership with the U.S.S.R. in the building of a postwar "one world" organization. In the pursuit of such an aim, grave sacrifices of vital American interests were made, the war was unnecessarily prolonged and nuclear warfare was needlessly initiated.

As one reviews the actions of Harry Dexter White, Alger Hiss, Owen Lattimore and Lauchlin Currie, it becomes obvious that their interest in Soviet expansion was not merely academic. The threats of Soviet statesmen have weight today primarily because President Franklin D. Roosevelt extended to a badly beaten and disorganized Russia the Lend-Lease help that transformed that nation-in-retreat into a conquering power, which was to move across the map of Europe in giant steps, not halting until it had drawn the new frontiers that now menace world peace. Roosevelt, not Stalin, shaped the growth of modern Russia, and General George C. Marshall achieved an unenviable reputation for guessing wrong in almost every crisis.

In preparing this book I have been particularly fortunate in having access to the private papers of General Patrick J. Hurley, our former Ambassador to Nationalist China. They shed a great deal of significant light upon the China policy of the Roosevelt administration.

At the Hoover War Memorial Library at Stanford University I was . . .

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