Care for Frail Elders: Developing Community Solutions

Care for Frail Elders: Developing Community Solutions

Care for Frail Elders: Developing Community Solutions

Care for Frail Elders: Developing Community Solutions

Synopsis

Leutz and his colleagues address a critical gap in health-care services for the elderly who live in the nation's communities. They provide practical guidance for implementing a community-based program of care and present new analyses of the range of needs among the frail aged. The book shows that planners and providers ought to consider differences in gender, culture, and individual status when determining health care needs. The authors carefully evaluate the range of needs, including demographics, gender and cultural differences, public and responses, and the effectiveness of Medicare and Medicaid.

Excerpt

The Speaker of the House of Representatives was on the phone to me and very upset that the home care budget crisis resulted in his mother's services being cut. He wasn't and isn't the only policymaker whose life is affected by the inadequacies of long-term care financing and policy. Having been involved in long-term care issues both as a bureaucrat and a policy analyst for the last 15 years, I am no longer surprised that personal experiences often drive policy. Unlike limited experiences of poverty, mental retardation, or spinal cord injury, aging, and its correlate long- term care, become nearly universal experiences for policymakers as they relate to "my mother" or "my father." It is not unusual that the analyst herself while running the numbers through the computer might have to interrupt work and go home to provide hands-on care to a frail elder. So, if "my mother" drives the policy world, one can expect much more action around long-term care and particularly community-based long-term care in the near future, notwithstanding current inaction and policy failures.

Over the past 10 or 12 years a number of important books and articles have been written that approach policy options in long-term care (Wallack and Callahan, 1981; Kane and Kane, 1987; Rivlin and Weiner, 1988; Davies and Challis, 1986; Weissert,Cready, and Pawelak, 1988). Each of these studies takes a somewhat different approach to the problem. One may focus on a description of options and how they impact upon various constituents. Another may focus on the lessons from hundreds of research reports and what they mean to policy. Another may try to anticipate the future using highly sophisticated computer models. Or, another may de-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.