The Rhetorics of Popular Culture: Advertising, Advocacy, and Entertainment

The Rhetorics of Popular Culture: Advertising, Advocacy, and Entertainment

The Rhetorics of Popular Culture: Advertising, Advocacy, and Entertainment

The Rhetorics of Popular Culture: Advertising, Advocacy, and Entertainment

Synopsis

Figures Preface Part I. Preliminaries The Nature of Popular Culture The Elements of Rhetoric Part II. Rhetoric and Advertising The Rhetoric of Direct Mail: The Verbal Pitch The Rhetoric of Print Advertising: The Visual Pitch The Rhetoric of Television Commercials: The Video Pitch Part III. Rhetoric and Advocacy The Rhetoric of Reviewing: Advocacy, Art, and Judgment The Rhetoric of Speculation: Science and Pseudo-Science, Advocacy and Evidence The Rhetoric of Opinion: Advocacy, Public Affairs, and Logic Part IV. Rhetoric and Entertainment A Listener's Guide to the Rhetoric of Popular Music A Viewer's Guide to the Rhetoric of Television A Reader's Guide to the Rhetoric of Popular Fiction Notes Appendix: Suggestions for Study Select Bibliography on Popular Culture Select Bibliography on Rhetoric Index

Excerpt

The application of rhetorical analysis to popular culture is not original with me, but it has certainly been one of my professional preoccupations since becoming dissatisfied with traditional literary criticism as a means of exploring popular literature and discovering how rhetoric could provide a way to comprehend the interaction between the public and such forms of discourse as advertising, reviewing, science writing, popular music, and popular fiction. This book is an attempt to provide an overview of both popular culture and rhetoric and to demonstrate through analysis of individual forms of popular culture the ways they create their "rhetorics"--their communication with, and sometimes persuasion of, popular audiences.

The book has been a long time evolving and I am grateful for the encouragement its various elements received long before I knew that a book would eventually emerge from these varied interests. Some chapters began as guest lectures in the classes of colleagues at Central Michigan University, principally Ken Jurkiewicz, John Dinan, and Ron Primeau in English, Jim Walling in Speech, and Fred Branfon in Religion. I am grateful to them for allowing me the opportunity to develop the initial approach of this work in their classes.

Several chapters have also been presented in somewhat different form to meetings of the Michigan Council of Teachers of English, the Popular Culture and American Culture associa-

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