Managing Human Productivity: People Are Your Best Investment

Managing Human Productivity: People Are Your Best Investment

Managing Human Productivity: People Are Your Best Investment

Managing Human Productivity: People Are Your Best Investment

Synopsis

This comprehensive text focuses on the transition underway in the fields of personnel and labor relations and guides the reader into the new era of human resources management. The book examines some current issues and topics that are producing solid results--results that make people feel part of the organization and that contribute to increased organizational effectiveness. The authors argue that these practices are not just passing fads, but proven concepts that should endure well into the future. The technical side of the labor relations process is also examined in depth as are training and career development, turnover, absenteeism, and substance abuse.

Excerpt

"Employees don't depreciate. Their value to the organization, when they are well-maintained, only appreciates."

-- David Decenzo

Throughout recorded history people have written about their visions of what the future may hold. One need only look at the Book of Revelations and the writings of Nostradamus for examples. In a slightly different fashion, people have written about their visions of what could be. Political figures frequently receive attention for that type of activity. The Great Society of Lyndon Johnson is an example in recent history of a political vision combined with a proactive movement that to some degree successfully realized it.

The history of the United States is short compared to that of other nations. A great deal, however, has been accomplished in that short time. We have gone from literally clearing trees for roads, factories, schools, and other necessities of civilization to building one of the most sophisticated societies in the world.

When people try to identify the reason for the poor record of treating workers in the United States they often point to this whirlwind of activity. We did not ease into an industrial revolution. Many activities and events provided simultaneous input into how things were done, many of which receive more . . .

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