Canadian Natural Resource and Environmental Policy: Political Economy and Public Policy

Canadian Natural Resource and Environmental Policy: Political Economy and Public Policy

Canadian Natural Resource and Environmental Policy: Political Economy and Public Policy

Canadian Natural Resource and Environmental Policy: Political Economy and Public Policy

Synopsis

This book examines policy-making in one of the most significant areas of activity in the Canadian economy - natural resources and the environment. It discusses the evolution of resource policies from the early era of exploitation to the present era of resource and environmental management. Using an integrated political economy and policy perspective, the book provides a comprehensive analytical framework from which the foundation of ideological perspectives, administrative structures, and substantive issues are explored. Departing from traditional approaches that emphasize a single discipline or perspective.

Excerpt

A political economic analysis of resource and environmental policy diverges from conventional approaches in several ways. in contrast to models that view state and economic institutions as inherently independent, for example, it explores the structural integration of economic and political forces and the alliance of these actors in the policy process. and it notes that the social and economic relations of production, as well as distributive processes, are factors shaping policy-making. the production and distribution of wealth at regional, national, and global levels are investigated as factors influencing the ways in which resource and environmental policy is made.

As discussed in Chapter 1, a political economic approach perceives environmental and resource policy as the product of the interplay of interests and ideas in the policy process. Interests are economic but also display social, technical, ideological, and, especially, political aspects. Relevant actors thus include governments and a variety of stakeholders representing different sectors and relations in the process of production. These actors have different ideological perspectives, cultural beliefs, and technological expertise, all of which enter into policy deliberations.

From this perspective, policy-making is seen as a dynamic process, subject to pressures by actors representing a spectrum of ideas and holding different stakes in the policy process and its outcomes over time. the potential for policy change, from a political economic perspective, is derived from shifts in these forces and relations of production. This chapter begins the analysis of the political economy of Canadian resource and environmental policy by identifying its fundamental economic, social, and political characteristics.

Understanding Canada's Resource-Dependent Political Economy

Central to the understanding of Canadian resource and environmental policy is an understanding of the operation of the Canadian economy. Its . . .

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