Fundamental Concepts of Inorganic Chemistry

Fundamental Concepts of Inorganic Chemistry

Fundamental Concepts of Inorganic Chemistry

Fundamental Concepts of Inorganic Chemistry

Excerpt

This textbook is the outgrowth of several years' experience in the teaching of a course designated as Advanced Inorganic Chemistry at Washington and Lee University. The college catalogue describes the course as a one-semester study of special topics in the field of inorganic chemistry for advanced undergraduates. A perusual of other catalogues indicates that a similar study is offered at many other colleges and universities. One irksome task connected with the organization of teaching material has been the yearly preparation of an up-to-date syllabus to serve as a guide for student study. Furthermore the use of such a syllabus has never been quite satisfactory to me or to my students. The present volume is an attempt to remedy the problems resulting from the nonexistence of a suitable textbook.

The field of inorganic chemistry is so broad that it would be foolhardy to undertake its coverage in a single volume. Without trying to define the limits of the field, it is possible to divide this branch of chemistry into two approaches, the theoretical and the experimental, neither of which can be thoroughly explored in the duration of a single semester. This book offers only an elementary approach to certain theoretical concepts.

The choice of materials has resulted from a process of elimination. In my teaching I have used a wide range of topics, and I regret that lack of space prevents the inclusion of many of them. The ones retained are those that appear to be essential.

Despite the description of this course as a study of special topics, an examination of the table of contents will disclose that the topics are not only related but more or less dependent upon each other. The first two chapters are devoted to an analysis of the structure of matter, in the form of atomic nuclei and atomic electron shells. The third chapter is concerned with the classification of the elements, and an attempt is made to correlate the various properties of the elements and their compounds. Chapter 4 analyzes the several types of bonds which may exist among atoms, ions, and molecules and makes some prediction as to what condi-

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