Anti-Kommunism in Latin America

Anti-Kommunism in Latin America

Anti-Kommunism in Latin America

Anti-Kommunism in Latin America

Excerpt

Guiseppe Garibaldi set out to free Italy with seven armed men and a mule. At the end of March, 1963, after seven years of exile, former President of Guatemala Juan Jos?é Aréaloreturned to his country to free it from dictatorship -- without any armed men and without a mule.

Garibaldi had a long bitter struggle to sweep out foreign invaders and petty tyrants. But within twenty-four hours of Arévalo's arrival to announce his candidacy for the November, 1963, elections, Dictator Miguel Ydígoras was flying into exile in Nicaragua.

Unfortunately the Guatemalan coup in no way represented liberation. Rather it was a further tightening of existing military brutality over a land already long mangled and trampled upon. The gorilla chewing up the little banana kingdom with his tanks and guns is General Enrique Peralta (Ydígoras' own Minister of War). He is a creature well trained in the United States for such monkeyshines (i.e., how to administer the local police state), and has been provided by our authorities with an over-kill supply of weapons and planes.

The reason for the armed coup is a reductio ad absurdum of the McCarthy mind. Dictator Ydigoras was "too soft on Communism." Yet Ydígoras had been perhaps the most conspicuous, ranting anti-Communist in the hemisphere. He had been the ideal yes-man for the United . . .

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