The United States and the First Hague Peace Conference

The United States and the First Hague Peace Conference

The United States and the First Hague Peace Conference

The United States and the First Hague Peace Conference

Excerpt

The present essay on the First Hague Peace Conference is an effort to examine in microcosm the two major themes of American foreign relations at the end of the nineteenth century. At that special moment in American history the nation was an aggressive power with imperial ambition. The Republic in 1898 waged war on Spain, a war of revenge for sinking the "Maine" and a war for the liberation of Cuba. Thereafter Americans sought colonial spoils and, generally, followed the national interest wherever it led. Yet even in those days of imperial struggle and intense nationalism the United States on occasion spoke out for peaceful settlement of international conflicts. This was the other side of the national policy. Both sides, both themes of our foreign relations, came to focus in the Hague Peace Conference of 1899.

I have based this study on as wide a range of historical materials as I could find. These include published records of the conference, published American, British, and German diplomatic papers, the minutes of the United States delegation at The Hague, and especially the unpublished archives of the Department of State and the unpublished personal papers of the . . .

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