Korea: A Study of U.S. Policy in the United Nations

Korea: A Study of U.S. Policy in the United Nations

Korea: A Study of U.S. Policy in the United Nations

Korea: A Study of U.S. Policy in the United Nations

Excerpt

This book had its beginnings with a study group which the Council on Foreign Relations organized in the autumn of 1950 under the joint chairmanship of Joseph E. Johnson, President of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Benjamin V. Cohen, then a member of the United States Mission to the United Nations, to consider United States policy in the United Nations. It was my privilege to be the research secretary of this Group. In planning the program of study, it seemed desirable to focus the Group's attention on United States policy in dealing with the Korean question through the United Nations. At that time the situation in Korea, then before the United Nations and of special concern to the United States, was at a critical stage.

The memoranda prepared for meetings of this Group and the discussions which took place provided the point of departure for the writing of this book. Nevertheless, it should be made clear that while I have drawn heavily on the discussions that took place in the meetings of the Group, I have not undertaken to report the views of members or to give expression to any general consensus. The opinions expressed are entirely my own. I feel greatly indebted, however, to those who took part in the meetings of the Group, both individually and collectively, for the assistance they gave me in developing and testing my own thinking.

I am grateful to the Council on Foreign Relations and its officers for facilitating the preparation and publication of this book. In addition, I am indebted to many individuals for encouragement and assistance, most of whom must remain unnamed. However, there are some who have been especially helpful and who deserve identification. Percy W. Bidwell gave me initial encouragement to write the book and devoted a great deal of his time and thought to helping make it a better book than it otherwise would have been. Benjamin V. Cohen and Joseph E. Johnson were most helpful in reading and criticizing early drafts and in providing good answers . . .

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