The California Economy, 1947-1980

The California Economy, 1947-1980

The California Economy, 1947-1980

The California Economy, 1947-1980

Excerpt

The rapid growth of California since World War II has created both problems and opportunities in business and in government. Growth is a matter of concern to all residents of the state, but it is of particular concern to those who must plan the activities of a great variety of organizations, both public and private. Since the planning process involves not only dealing with present problems but also preparing to meet those that may be expected to arise in the future, planning necessarily requires efforts to foresee future developments.

Well-recognized developments are those that reflect changes in the total growth of the state and areas within the state, such as the size and location of population and the level of employment and income; hence, the continuous appearance of projections of future population. In addition to the developments measured in terms of aggregative growth, there are two additional developments of key importance. They are expanding markets for business and industry, and growing needs for public facilities of all kinds.

The present study has been made in an effort to contribute to a better understanding both of California's growth since World War II and of its probable growth during the next two decades. The study is essentially an analysis of employment. Shifts in the patterns of employment by industries during the period 1947-57 are analyzed. Projections of employment in 1970 and 1980 were developed from projections of the output and productivity of the various agricultural, manufacturing, and service industries of the state's economy. A summation of the individual industry projections then provides an estimate of total employment for the state. Finally, on the basis of the ratio of civilian labor force to population and the probable rate of unemployment, an estimate of total population is derived. The treatment of all topics is brief in relation to the data and problems that are relevant, and some problems that were encountered in the analysis are not discussed in detail. (Research methodology and theoretical concepts underlying the methodology are discussed in Appendix A.)

In using the projections in this report, the planner should recognize a number of qualifications: . . .

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