The Emergence of Ethnicity: Cultural Groups and Social Conflict in Israel

The Emergence of Ethnicity: Cultural Groups and Social Conflict in Israel

The Emergence of Ethnicity: Cultural Groups and Social Conflict in Israel

The Emergence of Ethnicity: Cultural Groups and Social Conflict in Israel

Synopsis

"...the author has designed original research... to determine the ethnic awareness of kind and subjective feelings of power and belongingness in Israeli society. The empirical findings provide some very provocative insights into Israeli culture.... The strength of this book is its theoretical perspective applied to a specific empirical domain. Hopefully it will inspire more analysis in the same vein which will confirm or clarify the empirical findings presented." International Migration Review

Excerpt

"Contributions in Ethnic Studies" focuses upon the problems that arise when peoples with different cultures and goals come together and interact productively or tragically. The modes of adjustment or conflict are various, but usually one group dominates or attempts to dominate the other. Eventually some accommodation is reached: the process is likely to be long and, for the weaker group, painful. No one scholarly discipline monopolizes the research necessary to comprehend these intergroup relations. The emerging analysis, consequently, inevitably is of interest to historians, social scientists, psychologists, and psychiatrists.

"Israeli society has become ethnically pluralistic," Dr. Ben-Rafael demonstrates in this volume, for reasons the Israelis themselves more or less fully appreciate. The main emphasis is upon two so-called Oriental groups, originally from Yemen and Morocco, who compose, respectively, approximately 6 and 14 percent of the Jewish population. They are only two of the many minority groups who, with few exceptions, have occupied positions subservient to 45 percent of that population, the Jews who have migrated from Europe and America (the Ashkenazi). Arabs constitute 15 percent of the total population; yet, as one of them has said with only slight hyperbole, "My people are at war with my country."

The book is divided into four parts. The first section is devoted to a history of modern Israel and to presenting a theory of ethnicity. The theory is a general one and hence applicable outside of Israel. It may well constitute a scholarly landmark not only for sociologists, psychologists, and historians but also for decision makers and leaders who are . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.