The Study of International Relations in the United States: Survey for 1934

The Study of International Relations in the United States: Survey for 1934

The Study of International Relations in the United States: Survey for 1934

The Study of International Relations in the United States: Survey for 1934

Excerpt

This survey, made during the year 1933-1934, appears at an opportune time. At this juncture in our history, it would appear that the acceptance of the idea of a planned society may mark the transition from an old order to a new, not only as a means to economic recovery, but in all phases of our national life.

The old order as set forth in these pages is in the account of the miscellaneous activities and publications of voluntary societies of various sorts. The composite picture of such activities reveals in the American people a really remarkable interest in international problems. This interest, though a fad with the few, has become increasingly the serious concern of the many. In very recent years volunteer associations have worked more and more for definite national policies, and for the coordination of plans and policies of similar organizations, in the hope of helping to bring about, through the education of public and official opinion, a direction of world affairs which should lessen existing conflicts and increase the possibilities of peace between nations.

This survey registers the way in which the growing attention to the interplay of national interests has affected education, both formal and popular; it suggests similar trends in the arts and sciences and in business. Moreover, research projects which have paralleled the popular interest and made vital contributions to the study of international relations in the United States, have a place in every chapter. Frequently also the survey records the assistance which research has received from multiform grants-in-aid to institutions and individuals, as well as to projects of large proportions, which have been made available by the foundations, endowed by the merchant princes of pre-depression days.

All these activities, together with the changing character of college courses in response to contemporary events and problems, the coordination of activities of similar sorts through cooperations between similar organizations, and the increased number of international affiliations of all kinds which have developed since the War, may be taken to indicate a period of transition from a society of relatively haphazard concern with national policies to a new order, which, in proportion as it becomes . . .

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