The Making of Foreign Policy in Russia and the New States of Eurasia

The Making of Foreign Policy in Russia and the New States of Eurasia

The Making of Foreign Policy in Russia and the New States of Eurasia

The Making of Foreign Policy in Russia and the New States of Eurasia

Synopsis

"This fine collection ... fills many gaps about foreign policy directions of the states of the former Soviet Union and of Central Asia generally. It provides solid, sometimes outstanding treatment of the foreign policies of Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Armenia and Azerbaijan, Belarus, the Baltic states, and Russia. ... Recommended". -- Choice

Excerpt

This book is the fourth in a projected series of ten volumes produced by the Russian Littoral Project, sponsored jointly by the University of Maryland at College Park and the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. As directors of the project, we share the conviction that the transformation of the former Soviet republics into independent states demands systematic analysis of the determinants of the domestic and foreign policies of the new countries. This series is intended to provide a basis for comprehensive scholarly study of these issues.

This volume analyzes the foreign policy institutions and priorities of the new states. the collapse of the Soviet Union and the discrediting of Marxism-Leninism as a source of political legitimacy have prompted a search for fresh principles to guide the foreign policies in all the post-Soviet countries. in this search, one of the strongest potential sources of guidance is in the felt need for a defined national interest. the quest for a national interest, however, can have various political consequences, depending on the specific form of interest that becomes prevalent. This book examines which patterns of national interest formation have begun to emerge within the new states, along with the roles of various leaders and fragile institutions in the formulation of policy toward the outside world.

We would like to thank the contributors to this volume for their help in making the Russian Littoral Project a success and for revising their papers in a timely fashion. We are especially grateful to Adeed Dawisha for supporting the Russian Littoral Project since its inception, for contributing insights that were pivotal in structuring the project's treatment of foreign policy, and for coediting this book. in addition, we are grateful to Janine Ludlam, the executive director of the Russian Littoral Project, for organizing the conferences and undertaking the complex logistics involved in managing such a large project. Florence Rotz also deserves our thanks for assistance with the conferences and for editing the manuscripts of the nis scholars.

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