The Process of Business/Environmental Collaborations: Partnering for Sustainability

The Process of Business/Environmental Collaborations: Partnering for Sustainability

The Process of Business/Environmental Collaborations: Partnering for Sustainability

The Process of Business/Environmental Collaborations: Partnering for Sustainability

Synopsis

Confrontation may be one way of settling environmental disputes but is there a better way? Stern and Hicks say yes, and give executives the practical skills they need to work with environmentalists in mutually beneficial collaborations. And environmentalists get a demonstrably effective new way of working with corporations. Stern and Hicks draw from their own knowledge and others' in their field, to create a well written, easily accessed book, well illustrated with case studies--one that will be welcomed by corporate and environmental leaders alike.

Excerpt

This book is about how businesses and environmental organizations can successfully meet in voluntary collaborative partnerships to resolve differences and pursue joint goals. The notion of businesses and environmental organizations working together is a departure from past practices. Although there are many examples of collaborative partnerships, and their frequency is increasing, few organizations consider collaborating with traditional adversaries on a regular basis. One of the primary obstacles to organizations using collaborative partnerships to achieve their goals is their unfamiliarity with the approach. This results in (1) a tendency to dismiss or discount collaborating as a viable option and (2) a lack of understanding of how to initiate and implement a successful collaborative partnership.

The collaborative approach is not a replacement for traditional confrontation but rather provides an organization with another strategic option. Collaboration could be the first step in attempting to resolve conflicts and make decisions rather than the last option to be considered. The potential benefits are great. Nonetheless, the other alternatives remain available if the collaborative effort is not successful.

Most organizations that attempt to collaborate with the "other side" take an ad hoc approach, with little understanding of how to proceed and without applying the discipline and resources they would customarily apply to other activities. Organizations tend to . . .

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