In the Business of Child Care: Employer Initiatives and Working Women

In the Business of Child Care: Employer Initiatives and Working Women

In the Business of Child Care: Employer Initiatives and Working Women

In the Business of Child Care: Employer Initiatives and Working Women

Synopsis

"The focus of this short, well-written, and interesting book is employer support for child-care provision in the US. Topics include the need for and history of child care outside the home, the different types of support offered by employers (with examples), and the pros and cons for providing that support. An argument against expecting government assistance is presented. For Auerbach, a sociologist, an important consequence of the development of employer support is the legitimization of mothers working outside the home and children being cared for by nonfamily members. As a whole, this book provides a concise historical survey of this narrow topic." Choice

Excerpt

As ever increasing numbers of women with young children have entered the labor force in the 1980s, little by way of government resources has been dedicated to solving a growing child care problem. However, during the same period, an increasing number of employers have become involved in providing child care benefits and services to their employees. It is the purpose of this book to try to understand this phenomenon, and to begin to fit it into larger sociological questions about the links among gender, family, and work.

The book grew out of my interest in how the institutions of gender, family, and work intersect to create and maintain social inequality between men and women. in the course of investigating this question, it became evident to me that child care was at the core of this issue. That is, disparate but related social phenomena which are evidence of gender inequality, such as occupational segregation by sex, wage and income differentials between women and men, and the unequal division of household responsibilities, implicitly or explicitly have women's continued responsibility for child care at the center of their explanations.

But oddly, while occupational segregation, wage differentials, and the household division of labor have received a great deal of attention lately from sociologists, economists, and historians interested in gender inequality, child care itself has not. Analyse of child care have primarily been monopolized, on the one hand, by social welfare and public policy scholars who are . . .

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