Applied Child Study: A Developmental Approach

Applied Child Study: A Developmental Approach

Applied Child Study: A Developmental Approach

Applied Child Study: A Developmental Approach

Synopsis

Child study is a very complex field. Human beings, and children, specifically, are very complex beings. Consequently, simple answers and solutions to problems are very often just that: too simple. This text presents principles and methods for studying children in the varied contexts in which they live and function. These theories and methods can be used as a kind of "tool kit" for application in a variety of situations by the people who work with children such as researchers, parents, educators, pediatricians, nurses, social workers, and child psychologists, to name but a few. In short, the book is written for people interested in how to examine and describe children as well as those interested in creating educational environments for children.

Excerpt

This book is meant to serve as a source for the varied group of professionals who work with children. This group includes researchers, parents, educators, pediatricians, nurses, social workers, and child psychologists. in short, the book is written for those interested in examining and describing children as well as those interested in creating educational environments for children. As such, this book outlines different ways in which children can be viewed.

Child study is a very complex field; human beings, and children, specifically, are very complex. Consequently, simple answers and solutions to problems are very often too simple. a short example helps make the point. Most of us have had the unfortunate experience of having problems with our car. We take the car to the mechanic and explain the problem. the mechanic diagnoses the problem and attempts to solve it. We get the car back, and very often the problem is still there! Why is this all-too-familiar example relevant? the reason is, compared to children, cars are very SIMPLE! If well-trained professionals have difficulty with this relatively simple entity, think of the difficulty involved in "figuring out" children, who are vastly more complex than even the most complex car.

Our best hope for gaining insight into children and their worlds is through the systematic study of the varied contexts in which they live and function. This is best accomplished through training in a variety of methods following the scientific method. After a phenomenon is recognized, we should generate hypotheses, or educated hunches, that we think might be causing or related to the phenomenon. These hunches should then be tested, systematically, until we . . .

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