Maya and Spaniard in Yucatan, 1648-1812

Maya and Spaniard in Yucatan, 1648-1812

Maya and Spaniard in Yucatan, 1648-1812

Maya and Spaniard in Yucatan, 1648-1812

Synopsis

A study of the development of human society in Yucatan during the colonial period, this book poses a challenge to a variety of accepted views, including the notion that Yucatan was largely isolated from the main part of Spain's New World empire and thus from international markets and the world economy - an isolation often cited as the principal reason for the extended survival of indigenous culture in the region. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, Yucatan society was composed of both Maya and Spanish commonwealths, each with its own economic, social, and political organization. This book represents several new departures, both for what is known about colonial Yucatan and for colonial Latin American history in general. It forces the reader to rethink much of the received knowledge about acculturation, the hacienda, and inter-regional relations.

Excerpt

Over the course of the years I have incurred debts to people and institutions too numerous to list. I would, however, like to mention some of them, 'even though many of the individuals are now deceased. First, I would like to thank my teachers: Stanley J. Stein and Joseph R. Strayer, of Princeton University, and Joseph L. Love, of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Second, I thank the staffs of the Archivo General de la Nación, Archivo General del Estado, Archivo Notarial del Estado, Bliblioteca "Crescencio Carrillo y Ancona," Archivo Histórico Naclonal, and Archivo General de Indias, with special thanks to Luis López Rivas, Alfredo Barrera Vázquez, J. Ignacio Rubio Mañé, Miguel Civeira Taboadla, and Maria Teresa Monforte de Menéndez. Third, I thank my friends land colleagues for their support over the years, especially Antonio Calabria, Gilbert Joseph, Cristina García Bernal, Sergio Quezada, Salvador Rodríguez Losa, Edward Kurjack, Rodolfo Ruz Menéndez, Juan Francisco Peón Ancona, Michaelj. Fallon, Carlos Bojórquez Urzáiz, and Pedro Bracamonte y Sosa. I especially thank my wife Beatriz, not only for her support but also for constructive criticism. My debt to my mother and father is acknowledged in the dedication, but that to my brother Jim--one of my biggest obligations--is not, and I therefore acknowledge it here. Research was made possible in part by grants from the Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation and by a Foreign Area (Fulbright) Fellowship administered by the U.S.-Spanish Joint Committee for Cultural and Educational Cooperation.

Finally, a note about spelling. In order to simplify the identification of places, I have used the modern spelling of place-names. Hispanic surnames have also been modernized, but to retain some of the feeling of the past I have kept the older forms of given names (e.g. Joseph rather than José) and have used the original spelling in citing contemporary documents.

R. W. P.

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