Studies in Economic Development

Studies in Economic Development

Studies in Economic Development

Studies in Economic Development

Excerpt

This is a book of readings in the subject of economic development. It should be made clear at the outset that by economic development we refer not only to the problems of "underdeveloped countries," now struggling to extricate themselves from the toils of extreme poverty, but to the growth problems of the "advanced countries" as well. While the field is relatively "new"--though, perhaps paradoxically, it is also one of the oldest inquiries of systematic economic thought--interest in economic growth has been sufficiently contagious that since World War II the literature on this subject has reached flood proportions. Since the subject matter is so broad as not to lend itself too well to all-inclusive presentation in a single text, many teachers have preferred to assign to their students a number of specialized books and articles which represent prominent contributions in the field. Unfortunately, this has not been, in our own experience, an easy task, because many good and relevant articles are scattered throughout perhaps a score of journals. To ease this burden, this volume brings together selections on various topics which we consider to be useful and relevant for the student of economic development.

The volume is primarily addressed to an undergraduate audience studying economic development, either in courses exclusively oriented toward this subject or in the increasing number of other courses, in economics, sociology, and history, which are making room for this field in their syllabuses. It is also felt that graduate students may profit from the contents. The selections were made primarily with pedagogic criteria in mind, but happily enough the selections based on these criteria also represent in many cases original contributions by eminent writers in the field.

The plan of the volume is as follows. The introduction, Part One, consists of an essay by Professor Simon Kuznets; it explores some basic causes of the vast differences in levels of economic performance among the countries of the world. Part Two contains the major theories of economic growth spanning virtually the entire history of systematic thought, from Adam Smith to the present. Part Three is devoted to some approaches to the problems of the presently underdeveloped countries and encompasses some of the more controversial issues currently under discussion. Part Four considers some of the structural characteristics of both underdeveloped and advanced countries and changes in these characteristics that occur during the process of growth. In Part Five, a detailed discussion is presented on the meaning of and the problems of measurement inherent in some basic concepts and defini-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.