Spiritism and the Cult of the Dead in Antiquity

Spiritism and the Cult of the Dead in Antiquity

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Spiritism and the Cult of the Dead in Antiquity

Spiritism and the Cult of the Dead in Antiquity

Read FREE!

Excerpt

During the last quarter of a century interest in the phenomena of Spiritism, or Spiritualism as it is popularly called, has been growing steadily throughout the Western world. The Societies of Psychical Research in England, Germany, France, and America have gathered a vast body of data, and have subjected these to searching criticism. The results of these investigations have been published in the journals of the various societies, and have been popularized in the writings of such authors as Mr. Andrew Lang, Mr. F. W. H. Myers, Professor James Hyslop, Professor William James. Whereas formerly an attitude of Sadducean scepticism toward all the alleged facts of Spiritism was maintained by religion and by rationalism alike, at the present time no doubt is felt concerning the existence of hypnosis, somnambulism, automatic action, ecstasy, significant dreams, visions, auditions, telepathy, telesthesia, mind- reading, foreboding of the future, and all the other abnormal phenomena of the psychical life. The only difference of opinion is in regard to the interpretation of these phenomena. Many scientific investigators think that they can be explained completely by the influence of living minds upon themselves and upon other minds; other equally scientific investigators hold that this explanation is unsatisfactory, and that the ancient theory of the activity of disembodied spirits alone accounts for all the facts.

The events of the recent world-war have awakened widespread popular interest in the discussion of this question. Millions of choice young men of all civilized . . .

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