Historical Dictionary of Poland, 966-1945

Historical Dictionary of Poland, 966-1945

Historical Dictionary of Poland, 966-1945

Historical Dictionary of Poland, 966-1945

Synopsis

The first authoritative, comprehensive historical dictionary of Poland in English, this volume includes over 2,000 entries on people, events, places, and terms important to Poland's history from 966 to 1945. Entries include English and Polish language bibliographic sources. The student of Polish history seeking specific information on a person or event in medieval times, the troubled era leading to the late 18th century partitions of Poland, and the Polish nationalist struggles before 1919, reborn Poland in the interwar years, or the trauma of World War II will be amply rewarded by the accurate, concise information provided in this unique historical dictionary.

Excerpt

This encyclopedic presentation of Polish history and culture is competently and ably accomplished by the hand of George Lerski. The civilization of Poland, situated between the East and West of Europe, belongs to East-Central Europe and its main characteristic seems to be that it still generates its own culture. In Polish cultural history one also perceives the special value of its openness as a frequently realized and always vital model for social coexistence.

Poland, like her southwestern and southern neighbors, acquired in the year of her baptism into the Latin rite (966) a hereditary antiquity and Mediterranean civilization basic to the political and social forms elaborated upon by early Western Europe. Preserving her traditional culture shared with the other Indo- European peoples as fundamental to national culture, Poland of the tenth and eleventh centuries assimilated Christianity as her universal religious and ethical system. This paved the way to the absorption and adaptation of state and social institutions of the West, and Poland drew from them cultural, literary and artistic models, creatively applying them to her own needs. During the fourteenth- and fifteenth-century political changes, Western Romanesque art reached the Wisla River, and Western Gothic art embraced the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, which at first had been joined by a personal union, then reached the geographic line linking Vilna and Lvov. The next great cultural wave of the Renaissance and Baroque eras carried the forms and contents of European civilization as far as Vitebsk and Kiev, to the perimeters of the Polish- Lithuanian Commonwealth. Two special features of this federated state drew the attention of contemporaries. First was the supremacy of the law over the monarch, or the political rights and impact of the nobility or gentry (10 percent of the population) on the government, as well as the legal guarantees of the towns, including the autonomous Jewish settlements. Second was the absence of religious wars, as a result of official recognition of freedom of religions other . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.