Transferring Juveniles to Criminal Courts: Trends and Implications for Criminal Justice

Transferring Juveniles to Criminal Courts: Trends and Implications for Criminal Justice

Transferring Juveniles to Criminal Courts: Trends and Implications for Criminal Justice

Transferring Juveniles to Criminal Courts: Trends and Implications for Criminal Justice

Synopsis

Champion and Mays offer the first in-depth investigation of the juvenile transfer process together with long range implications for the criminal justice system. Their analysis includes descriptions of juvenile courts, types of offenders processed, and characteristic outcomes. The authors explore social and legal definitions of delinquency; goals and functions of transfers; legal rights of juveniles; implications of possible penalties, such as the death penalty; and, ideal versus real results of transfers. This book is designed for majors in criminal justice, public administration, political science, sociology, and psychology.

Excerpt

Transferring Juveniles to Criminal Courts is about a growing and increasingly important phenomenon for both the criminal and juvenile justice systems. During the last several decades numerous reforms have been suggested or implemented throughout the criminal justice process. These reforms have pertained to sentencing procedures, greater emphasis on equating punishments to fit crimes in accordance with "just deserts" and justice, greater inmate access to the courts and the increased sophistication of inmate litigation, experiments with alternative intermediate punishments, and the introduction of an assortment of interventions designed to prevent crime or deter criminals. the perception of a rising tide of crime has been countered with a series of "get tough" policies for offender processing and management. a concomitant of these and other massive reforms throughout the criminal justice system has been a major policy shift regarding the treatment and processing of serious juvenile offenders. Since the mid-1960s juveniles have incurred substantial legal rights almost commensurate with those enjoyed by adults. While in some states a unified court system is still a remote event that may or may not occur in future years, it is significant that . . .

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