The Left Wing in Japanese Politics

The Left Wing in Japanese Politics

The Left Wing in Japanese Politics

The Left Wing in Japanese Politics

Excerpt

The successful solution to the problem of Communism in Japan, while not as immediate as that in Korea, is of vital importance not only to Japan but to the United States. While a peace treaty with Japan will reduce many of our direct responsibilities concomitant with the occupation and will increase those of the Japanese Government, it seems highly probable that we will have continuing obligations for security in that country for some time to come. Obviously, the strength of the left-wing movement in the future will have a direct bearing on Japan's security. In fact, Ambassador John Foster Dulles, the President's representative for the Japanese Peace Treaty, emphasized early in 1951 while in Tokyo that if Japan is disposed to protect itself from "indirect aggression," or the growth of Communism from within, it can then share in the collective security of the Allies.

Consequently, it is gratifying to have this book on the role of the proletarian movement in Japanese politics appear at this time, in order to be able to assess the actual dangers of Communism within Japan. Mrs. Colbert speaks with authority. She has called upon the knowledge which she has acquired through a long concentration on Japanese political developments to produce a carefully documented, scholarly, and penetrating analysis of this all-important aspect of modern Japan. Despite the fact that Japan's left-wing movement is complicated and confusing, Mrs. Colbert has presented a dear picture of it during its various phases from its origin after World War I to the purging of the Communist leaders in June 1950. The first section is a short analysis of the struggle during the 1920's for the control of the left-wing movement by the various proletarian groups, the rise of national socialism in the next decade under the leadership of the Shakai Taishuto and the exile of the Japanese Communists in China. The main body of the study covers three periods: (1) the rapid growth of proletariat groups in the new atmosphere of political freedom created by . . .

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