Wildcat Strike

Wildcat Strike

Wildcat Strike

Wildcat Strike

Excerpt

This is the second report on our gypsum studies and is, as such, the companion piece to Patterns of Industrial Bureaucracy. The present volume has, however, been prepared in a manner enabling it to be read independently of the first.

I should like to express my deep appreciation to the Social Science Research Council, and to its executive associate Mr. Elbridge Sibley, for two grants which greatly facilitated the completion of this study. The first of these was an appointment to the Council's seminar on "Leadership and Small Group Behavior" held at Dartmouth College in the summer of 1952. My co-participants in this seminar, Bernard Bass, Cecil Gibb, John Hemphill, Seymour M. Lipset, and Ben Willerman did much to stimulate the thinking that went into this report. A second award in 1953 provided an opportunity to complete the write-up of the study. On both occasions, the excellent facilities of Baker Library at Dartmouth College were generously made available through the good offices of G. H. Gliddon.

Those familiar with the seminal thinking of Robert K. Merton will recognize at a glance the variety and depth of our obligation to him. Indeed, it was at Mr. Merton's encouragement that I undertook to prepare this study for publication. I am, also, gratefully aware of the insight I have derived from the studies of other social scientists and, particularly, from Talcott Parsons, John R. Commons, Max Weber, and Sigmund Freud. That I have nowhere felt a need to engage in the mere exegesis of their work, but have sought only to use it in attacking new problems is, perhaps, still another indication of the vitality of their ideas.

There is a special debt that I owe to my friend and former de-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.