Methods and Materials for Teaching General and Physical Science

Methods and Materials for Teaching General and Physical Science

Methods and Materials for Teaching General and Physical Science

Methods and Materials for Teaching General and Physical Science

Excerpt

The curriculum of the school is evolving from an emphasis upon subjects and textbooks to a concern for student experience. If the teacher is to remain effective in such a changing scene his competence must increase correspondingly. The academic and professional preparation of teachers has been of a formal nature; their teaching, as a consequence, has tended to be equally formal. They have lacked much of the competence essential to the encouragement of and provision for genuine experience.

This volume proposes ways of building competence in the teacher of general and physical science. It is concerned with the use of the laboratory--interpreted broadly--as the basis for experience. Suggestions are made for procedures, techniques, skills, and details of specific experiences. The values of this volume can be realized most effectively through its use in a laboratory situation. In such a situation genuine problems are sensed and there is provision for their solution. Because of the method of organization, the materials included can be used in different ways to assist in the solution of a wide variety of problems.

The contents have been planned primarily for teachers of general and physical science in the secondary school, but Part One, at least, should be useful to teachers of biology. Because of the extensiveness of similar materials in biological science and because there are several excellent sources of these materials, the present treatise is limited to general and physical science. Much of the entire volume should be valuable to teachers concerned with science in the elementary school. Teachers of general physics, general chemistry, and physical science in college also should find the volume useful in their work.

This volume may be a useful reference for the teacher who is attempting to provide a broad range of worth-while experiences; in many instances this volume may be placed in the hands of the student so that he may have a firsthand source of ideas. Prospective teachers of science may profitably use this volume not only to gain some rather specific knowledge of value to their day-by-day work in later teaching but also to obtain perspective on the problems of the science teacher, and of procedures involved in meeting these problems.

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