International Regionalism: Readings

International Regionalism: Readings

International Regionalism: Readings

International Regionalism: Readings

Excerpt

The number of international regional arrangements is increasing. Of twenty-three regional groupings listed in a recent text, only one-- the inter-American system--existed before World War II. By a recent account 92 countries are members of 'one or more of the nine regional organizations with mutual security commitments. If United Nations regional commissions and regional development banks were added to the table on p. xii, few countries would not be included in that list of members of regional arrangements.

Regionalism has recently been called "a halfway house between the nation-state and a world not ready to become one," "the next big step forward in international cooperation," "the most hopeful event in Asia today," and "the only hope of achieving the viability that is essential [in Africa]." Even General de Gaulle has said that "it is in keeping with the conditions of our times to create entities more vast than each of the European states. The United States, long a supporter of European regional integration and the "switch- board for most of the regional and joint efforts in the free world" in the early 1950's, has publicly committed itself to support of a Latin American Common Market and has revamped its aid program for Africa to emphasize regional cooperation. In the view of one . . .

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