Political Science and Government

Political Science and Government

Political Science and Government

Political Science and Government

Excerpt

In the writing of this book my aim has been primarily to provide college and university students with a fairly comprehensive and up-to- date textbook on political science and government. It is hoped that the book may in some degree serve also the needs of others who are interested in the fundamental problems of the state and in the organization and functions of government.

The subject matter covered is divided into two parts. Part One deals with the nature, scope, and methods of political science and its relations to the allied or auxiliary sciences; the nature, constituent elements, and attributes of the state; nations and nationalities; theories concerning the nature of sovereignty; and the various forms and associations of states. Part Two is concerned with forms and types of government; the elements of strength and weakness of the different forms; the principal theories that have been maintained in regard to the proper functions of government and the actual practice in the past and to-day; constitutions, their nature and types; the theories which have prevailed in the past relative to the nature of the suffrage, and the electorate as it is constituted to-day; and, finally, the constitution and rôle of the legislative, executive, and judicial organs of the more important states of the world. An attempt has been made to compare and evaluate the varying solutions reached in the different countries and to draw such conclusions as reason and experience seem to warrant.

The World War was followed by many fundamental changes in the governmental organization, especially of European states. Monarchies were transformed into republics or reorganized and made more democratic; rock-ribbed autocracies were overthrown and replaced by popular governments; long-established political unions were dissolved; powerful states were split into fragments and some of their parts erected into new states; new constitutions, with elaborate bills of rights proclaiming the sovereignty of the people and providing safeguards for individual liberty, took the place of those promulgated by . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.