The New Society

The New Society

The New Society

The New Society

Excerpt

The republication of my brief survey of world politics invites a word of comment. That this survey was originally slanted for a British audience need not be a serious drawback. Few of the problems confronting Britain since the end of World War II have not had their parallels and their repercussions on American soil: Americans neither can be, nor are, indifferent to them. It is even clearer today than in 1951, when these talks were first heard and published that both countries confront the world situation from somewhat different angles of vision, but with substantial identity of aim and purpose.

Slightly more adjustment will perhaps be required to take account of the passage of time. The lapse of almost six years has sharpened in several respects the picture presented in these talks, but has done little to alter its main outlines. On one point, indeed, it seems to me that current American attitudes, thanks to the hydrogen bomb, have approached more nearly to those of Britain: I should no longer today be tempted to depict American opinion as primarily pre-occupied with how to win a third world war, or oppose it to British opinion which was, and is, concerned only with how to avoid it. But the essentials of Anglo-American relations remain unchanged. The ending of British supremacy in the world, and the implications of this change for the . . .

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